Day 14: Lesson 18 – Advanced Stalls

Went up again this afternoon for my second lesson on stalls (“Advanced Stalls”). Kind of odd to be heading out to the training area with a different instructor. (Ashley again, with whom I did my first solo this morning).

Weather has cleared a fair bit, we had a few clouds at 3,000 feet so much different from the past few days. An upwind departure in UFY from 29R and straight out to the training area. Ashley walked me through a few of the technicalities in terms of heights that need to be maintained between aerodrome and the training area, none of which really sunk in too much but I’m sure I’m about to get much more familiar with this detail!

Climbing to 3,500 feet above a remote part of the training area we did our HASELL checks (see first stalls lesson entry for details) and then ran through some of the basic stalls that were covered in the first lesson. Basic power-off stall, power-on stall, stall with flaps.

We then did what is apparently considered “advanced” stalling, which seems to entail how to handle a stall in a landing approach situation in which you’re typically at low speed, two stages of flaps out and not always 100% focused on the airspeed. Same procedure as other stalls: reduce power, extend flaps, then pull back on the control yoke to maintain height while the airspeed bleeds off and the nose of the aircraft gets higher and higher. Stall approaches when things go quiet, airframe starts to “buffet” and the stall warning indicator sounds. (Indicator failed to sound in UFY during this lesson, a fact which needs to go on the plane’s Maintenance Release post-haste).

Did this a couple of times and then performed (satisfactorily) another basic stall so that Ashley could sign me off as being competent on stalls.

Interestingly, the Warrior appears to be so stable as a training aircraft that it’s quite difficult to get it to drop a wing during a stall! If you have a wing drop in that situation, correct action is to apply firm opposite rudder to level the wing, then lower nose slightly and apply full power. But I wasn’t able to demonstrate the rudder technique as UFY simply would not drop a wing in the stall. (Actually, I was using a tiny bit of rudder to counteract what felt a bit like a tendency to drop wing, but the wing never went so far as to drop).

Heading back to Bankstown I got some new exposure to inbound approaches. It was easier to spot the 2RN (radio) tower today, so we made our inbound call from there at 1500 feet and were cleared for a crosswind approach to runway 29 right. Joining the circuit for the runway I was high, so really had to throw out the anchors to lose height and ended up with a fairly poor landing (bang!) But what was really poor about this landing was the roll. Not sure what I did – maybe just touched a bit of pedal – but all of a sudden UFY was careering left and right and Ashley had to take over to control the landing roll.

Urrrghhh. One of those cringeworthy moments you experience when learning to fly. I apologised to Ashley, of course, who was very good about it and told me (correctly) that I’ll get it right. But this is the 2nd time I’ve done that. I’m going to have to own up to John and ask him to help me make sure we get this sorted.

I’m just glad I didn’t do this on my solo landing earlier in the morning!

Anyway, chalk up another hour, and the completion of my stalls training (for now).

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3 responses to “Day 14: Lesson 18 – Advanced Stalls

  1. Pingback: Day 15: Lessons 19 and 20 – 2nd and 3rd solos « MidLifePilot's Flying Blog

  2. Pingback: Day 14: Lesson 18 – Advanced Stalls (via MidLifePilot’s Flying Blog) « Calgary Recreational and Ultralight Flying Club

  3. Pingback: Day 21: Lesson 28 – Incipient Spins and Steep Turns « MidLifePilot's Flying Blog

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